A web site for the village of Hartshorne,
Derbyshire, United Kingdom.

 
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Field names

The following names were found in Enclosure Act 1766 and Sale book of Carnavon estate 1911

Bayleys Field (Hartshorne)
Brickhouse Hill Field (a close of vanished Brickhouse Farm)
Bugley Meadow ('ley' is old English for clearing)
Cheese Meadow (on Short Hazel Farm)
Crams Lands Close (old English for crooked lands)
Cutting Knife Close (?)
Dethicks Brigg (Close near a bridge)
Dyers Croft (indicates some kind of crop)
Foulas Ridding (dirty land)
Gravel Plough (close top of Gravel pit Hill - plough indicates it is arable land)
Overwood (a close of six acres)
Spencers bit (land owned by a Spencer)
Wilderfield (land owned by a Wilder family)
Tewitt Hill or Peewit Hill
Ninelands (large field near Goseley)

Some other field names in Hartshorne

Bugley Meadow (Bugy = Rough, Ley, Old English Leah = Clearing, literal translation = Rough clearing. Local interpretation of the name has Bugley meaning spirit or ghost, therefore a place occupied by spirits).

Carver's Rocks (also known at various times as Lowes Rocks, Dawsons Rocks, Repton Rocks and Hartshorne Rocks. The Dawson family lived at Repton Waste Farm. The Carvers were a Hartshorne family. One member of the family was Church Warden in 1787 and another an Overseer in 1809.)

Dethick Bridge (The Dethicks were an influential family. In 1624 Reverend William Dethick bequeathed £100 to the parishes of Newhall and Hartshorne See Organisations/Charities).

Hoofies Farm (Corruption of the Old English, Holh, meaning hollow. Appears as Hulley in a Charter of 1260 granting land at Hartshorne to a Canon of Rependon - Repton. Translates as: an enclosure in a hollow).

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