A web site for the village of Hartshorne,
Derbyshire, United Kingdom.

 
 

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Domesday Book

The Domesday survey began at the 1085 Christmas Court of King William I of England (known as 'The Conqueror') to provide a record of the land he had conquered 20 years before in 1066. When the king took council with his advisors, disputes about landholdings continually disturbed the collection of taxes. In 1086 Royal commissioners were sent out to every shire with a long list of questions. The king died before it was completed. 900 years later (1986 was the 900th anniversary of the publication of the book) 90% of the towns & villages still remain.

The original book was hand-written by, probably, a single monk. It still exists and is kept at the UK's Public Record Office in Kew (where the Gardens are) near London. They are kept secure in a metal chest, to be acrefully removed every few centuries or so when they need re-binding.

 

The irony is that few of his subjects could read ...

 

 

The questionnaire sent out for the Domesday survey asked:

 

 

The name of the place
Who held it before 1066
Who holds it now (1085)
How many hides (1 hide of 20 acres could support 1 family)
How many ploughs
How many Lordships
How many men
How much woodland
How much meadow
How much pasture
How many villages
How many cottagers
How many slaves
How many free men
How many Freeman
How many mills
How many fish ponds
What the total value was
What the total value is
How much each free man or Freeman had or has

The manor of Heorteshorne was in the Wapentake of Walecros later called the Repton Wapentake. A Wapentake is an area of a Country. Derbyshire or Derbyscire was divided into 6 Wapentakes.

The 2 entries for Hartshorne were as follows:

Manerium (Manor) Heorteshorne

Aluric had four carucates for geld. Land for four ploughs. It is waste. Wood, pasturable, half-a-mile in length, and half-a-mile in breadth. Arable land of the same extent. In the time of King Edward it was worth four pounds, now ten shillings.

In another Heorteshorne (Hartshorne obviously was comprised of two settlements)...

Manerium Heorteshorne

Aluric had two carucates of land for geld. Land for two ploughs. It is waste. Wood, pasturable, half-a-mile in length, and half-a-mile in breadth. Arable land of the same extent. In the time of King Edward it was worth forty shillings, now ten shillings.

 

The manors of Hartshorne were given by William the Conqueror to one of his followers, Henry de Ferrars.

 

Glossary of terms

See the glossary in the history archive for information about the historic terms.

If you want to get a rebound copy of this famous book then visit the Domesday Book web site.
(09/06/09)

Source: Mr Alan E Sherratt, Hartshorne - An Historical Collection, p 16-17.

 

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